Background

Matthew Dallek is an Assistant Professor of Political Management in the Graduate School of Political Management at George Washington University, where he teaches courses on political leadership, the presidency, and Washington. His first book, "The Right Moment: Ronald Reagan’s First Victory and the Decisive Turning Point in American Politics," traced Reagan’s rise to power in California in the mid-1960s. He is now working on a political history of Eleanor Roosevelt’s battle to enact a wartime New Deal and Fiorello La Guardia’s effort to militarize the home front during World War II (Oxford University Press).

Dallek’s research interests include modern American political history, campaigns and elections, the use of presidential power, and the conservative movement. He has published articles and reviews in an array of scholarly and popular publications including the online political science journal Forum, the Journal of American History, the Washington Post, the NYTimes.com, the Los Angeles Times, POLITICO, the Atlantic, and the American Scholar.

Prior to joining GSPM, Dallek held fellowships at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and the Alicia Patterson Foundation. A former visiting scholar at the Bipartisan Policy Center, he also worked as an Associate Academic Director at the University of California Washington Center, where he taught classes on Congress, the presidency, and research methods. He has also appeared as a guest lecturer and delivered talks at Yale, Notre Dame, Carnegie Mellon, and George Mason among other universities.

In addition to his academic research, writing, and teaching, Dallek served as a speechwriter for House Minority Leader Richard A. Gephardt and Federal Communications Commission Chairman William E. Kennard. He graduated from Columbia with a Ph.D. in history and received his B.A. in history from the University of California, Berkeley. Born and raised in Los Angeles, he now lives in Washington, D.C. with his wife, Tara Sarathy, and two sons, Sammy and Eli.

 

Education

Ph.D., Columbia University

M.A., Columbia University

B.A., University of California, Berkeley

Publications

Books

The Right Moment: Ronald Reagan’s First Victory and the Decisive Turning Point in American Politics” (Free Press, 2000; Oxford University Press, 2004)                                    

In Progress: “‘Think War, Sleep War, and Eat War’: Eleanor Roosevelt, Fiorello La Guardia, and the Struggle to Enact a Wartime New Deal and Defend the Home Front in World War II” (Oxford University Press)

 

Peer-Reviewed Journal Articles

Ken Goldstein, Matthew Dallek, Joel Rivlin, “Even the Geeks are Polarized: The Dispute over the ‘Real Driver’ in American Elections,” The Forum (2014)

Matthew Dallek, Ken Goldstein, "Was It a Wave? What Does It Mean?," The Forum (2014)

Forthcoming: “London Burning: The Blitz of England and the Origins of 'Home Defense' in Twentieth-Century America,” Journal of Policy History (2015)

 

Other Writings

Review of David Nasaw’s The Patriarch: The Remarkable Life and Turbulent Times of Joseph P. Kennedy, Journal of American History (2014)

Contributor, The American Odyssey: A History of the United States, Ed. By Morton Keller, Mary Beth Klee, Joshua Zeitz, and John Holdren.

“Civic Security,” Democracy: A Journal of Ideas. (2008)

“Rough Times for Obama? Sure. But Nixonian? Please.” Op-Ed, The Washington Post Sunday Outlook Section (cover) (2013)

“Review of The Promise: President Obama, Year One,” by Jonathan Alter, The Washington Post Book World (cover). (2010)

“History Warns Obama on Primaries,” Politico. (2010)

“The Rift that Could Kill Health Care,” The Daily Beast. (2010)

“A Long Tradition,” op-ed, NYTimes.com, “Room for Debate blog.” (2009)

“Not Ready for Mt. Rushmore,” The American Scholar. (2009)

“On Voting Rights, the Court Finds Consensus,” co-authored with Mary Ellen Curtin, TheAtlantic.com. (2009)

“Theodore C. Sorensen: Words to Inspire,” Humanities, the magazine of the National Endowment for the Humanities. (2009)

“Revisionists Offer Blind View of New Deal,” Politico. (2009)